Category Archives: Fit After Fifty

Defying the Aging Process

At 50 you’re expected to be close to achieving your life’s professional and personal goals. Time is always crunched and priorities change resulting in stress and related ailments.

Is 50 old or young? Indian psephologists, in their analysis of the 2014 Lok Sabha election results classified 50 plus as old and concluded that the people of India have voted for an “old” Parliament. This is a very generic classification, and I know of many who are young at 60 or even 70. It’s all about how you choose to age.

Ageing starts with birth.  Stress, inter-alia, accelerates the ageing process and a sedentary lifestyle adds to your medical woes. Inactivity slows you down, makes you lose your independence and increases medical expenditure.

So how does one cope with this phenomenon called ageing without having to give up on the quality of your life? Watching what you eat is definitely a good start. “What you eat today… you wear tomorrow” says an expert. Meditate and calm your mind. You have a lot of noise there thanks to the overload on your five sensory organs – tongue, ear, eyes, nose and skin (touch). Enter technology which aims to create a quantum of solace in each of them, while unmindfully creating new types of stress and accelerating the ageing process in you.

Age and Physical Condition notwithstanding, regular exercising carries its rewards.  Exercising delays the ageing process and helps in a multitude of ways. Exercising does not necessarily mean pushing yourself to the limit like athletes do. The goal of an athlete is to win. Speed and Strength are ubiquitous in them.  The Olympic motto is “Citius, Altius, Fortius” which is Latin for “Faster, Higher, Stronger.” Our motto is Slower Ageing, Higher Metabolism and Stronger Body & Mind for quality in life.

Well, if you haven’t exercised earlier or have for some reason pressed the pause button on a schedule that you were following earlier, it is a challenge to start. You will be dogged with concerns of injury, illness due to lack of fitness, probably fatigue and even general boredom; from giving it a try.  In fact these are probably the very reasons why you need to incorporate exercise in your daily routine. Exercise is good for your body and mind. It boosts your energy, improves your fitness, sometimes reverses symptoms of ageing and relieves stress.

Once you have earmarked a time that is comfortable for you, make it a non-negotiable part of your daily routine. Wear a comfortable outfit and ensure you have the right footwear. It is recommended that you start with a few stretches before you embark on your routine. Start slow with an easy routine. Walking, Swimming and Yoga are excellent exercises to adopt in your daily routine. You could switch between them, so you don’t get bored with repetition. These are low-impact exercises and therefore have almost no risk of injury due to exercise. Exercising in the presence of a good trainer for each of these is highly recommended. This will mitigate the risk of injury due to wrong execution of the routine or due to an accident. Of course, before you embark on the routine, do consult your family physician.

Exercise boosts mood and self-confidence, improves sleep, and is good for the brain. Get medical clearance, consider health concerns, start slow, commit to an exercise schedule, stay motivated by focusing on short-term goals, recognize problems – stop when it hurts and see your doctor.

So, are you 50 or above? There is no better day than today to start in earnest.

About the Author:

Naresh is a retired senior company executive and now an independent consultant. He is a dedicated  fitness enthusiast and a rowing athlete, who advocates working out at any age.

Photo Credit: Image 1Image 2

Copyright 2014 (c) Primex Scans and Labs. Please do not reproduce this article in its entirety without permission. Alternatively, a link to this URL would be appreciated.

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The Workout Series – Brain Health

A friend’s grandmother is used to meeting her Quiz club every month. Since she turned 80, the family insists that she not drive herself and rather get dropped and picked up on her outings. While, the old lady gracefully accepted the wishes of her family, she still finds it tough as occasionally the non-availability of family, to chauffeur her to her regular meetings, makes her feel depressed. The lady in question is in peak health with her only problem being slightly weakened eyesight and a sensitive stomach. According to this grandmother she feels physically older and mentally less capable, if she misses a few of her Quiz Club meetings.

This is apparently, not a psychological effect. Using her mental faculties actively on a regular basis has probably helped her stay younger than her numerical age. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, a well-educated person, who has regular mental stimulus, maybe less likely to be affected by Alzheimer’s than a person who has had a minimum level of education. According to research, keeping the brain active seems to increase its vitality and may build its reserves of brain cells and connections. “You could even generate new brain cells.”

Once her family understood the benefits of her Quiz sessions on their grandmother’s quality of life, she has never been short of chauffeurs.

Here are a few tips from the Alzheimer’s Association on keeping your brain active everyday: 

  • Stay curious and involved — commit to lifelong learning
  • Read, write, work on crosswords or other puzzles
  • Attend lectures and plays
  • Enroll in courses that interest you
  • Play games
  • Garden
  • Try memory exercises

Another way to improve your mental stamina and concentration is to meditate. If you are new to medication, check out our simple tips here, to help you get started.

So, go on, start that Sudoku challenge that you have been putting off for years. It’s never too late or too early.

About the Author:

Niranjani is an entrepreneur and blogger who believes that good quality, affordable healthcare should be available to all. She occasionally puffs and pants her way through a 10k race to feel fit, despite her chaotic life.

Photo Credit: Image 1, Image 2

Copyright 2014 (c) Primex Scans and Labs. Please do not reproduce this article in its entirety without permission. Alternatively, a link to this URL would be appreciated.

5 Healthy Ideas to Try This Week

Every January all of us make resolutions, many of which center around health and fitness. The problem with these resolutions is, we have the big picture but not the steps to achieve them and so they ultimately fall by the wayside. This year, we at Beaming Health Magazine decided to share a few tips to help you stay on the road to good health and fitness. So, plunge right in and do let us know which ones worked for you. 

  • Let the Winter Olympics inspire you to reconnect with a childhood game. Be it hockey, tennis, basketball, swimming or even just running free.
  • Discuss an issue that has been creating undue stress for you with someone you can rely on. Then work on eliminating or at least minimizing the source of that stress 
  • Eat one green meal every week. Be it an exotic one or a simple and delicious homemade one, the focus is on including as much raw plant-based food as possible in that meal
  • Switch off all electronic devices an hour before you go to sleep and read a book instead. This includes all computers, phones and the television
  • Spend five minutes in the morning doing a few, simple stretching or deep breathing exercises before you start your day. The quality of transition time, from sleep to alertness will make a difference to the quality of your day

Make these small changes in your weekly routine and soon you’ll be thanking us.

About the Author:

Niranjani is an entrepreneur and blogger who believes that good quality, affordable healthcare should be available to all. She occasionally puffs and pants her way through a 10k race to feel fit, despite her chaotic life.

Photo Credit: Image 1

Copyright 2014 (c) Primex Scans and Labs. Please do not reproduce this article in its entirety without permission. Alternatively, a link to this URL would be appreciated.

A Cup a Day Keeps the Doctor Away

A cup of green tea a day keeps cancer and wrinkles away.

Actually it’s 3-5 cups a day and you can add tooth decay to that line above. It’s not called a cup of magic for nothing.

Now, here’s a little story for you. A long time ago (around 2737 B.C.) Emperor Shen Nung was relaxing under a shady tree with a drink of freshly boiled water, when a leaf floated down and softly landed in his cup. A gentle aroma soon rose from the water and when the emperor took a sip he was rewarded with the delightful flavour of the world’s first cup of green tea. I’m not sure how much of this story is fact or fiction, given that tea leaves do not grow on trees, however, over the next 2000 years or so the delights and benefits of this gentle brew spread from China to Japan, and other parts of Asia.

Today, while the whole world is drinking this bittersweet brew, because it’s ‘the thing to do’, most of us are not fully aware of the benefits we’ll be reaping. Here are a few pointers you may want to share with the last few non-green tea-drinkers on planet earth.

Oxidative stress plays a crucial part in a number of human diseases, including the much dreaded cancer . One way to protect our bodies from anti-oxidant stress is to maintain an optimum level of anti-oxidants in our system While, Vitamin E and C are well-known anti-oxidants, green tea is supposed to be 24 times more effective than the former and 100 times more effective than the latter! Specifically, it is thought to reduce the risk of breast cancer, prostate cancer and colorectal cancer.

In an extension of the previous point, anti-oxidants reduce and even prevent cell damage, thereby acting as both a deterrent to heart disease and helping with recovery after a coronary attack. Green tea has the ability to accelerate glucose and lipid metabolism, which can help with diabetes, cholesterol and obesity. So both a diabetic grandparent and a teenager fighting puppy fat can benefit from a few cups a day. Talking of older people, the anti-inflammatory benefits of green tea can even help with rheumatoid arthritis and other common joint complaints. Matter of fact, in controlled human trials, green tea as shown to increase fat oxidation by 17% and energy expenditure by 4%.

In Asia, particularly India and China, green tea has been used for centuries as an astringent, stimulant, diuretic, as well as, to deal with flatulence, to regulate body temperature, to control the levels of blood sugar, and as an aid to digestion. It even kills bacteria which affect our teeth, thereby improving our dental health and reducing the risk of infections.

You want that make-up-advertisement-like glow? Get it the natural way, with no make-up. Sip a cup of green tea while reading your glossy magazine! The best part, that little bit of tummy bloat from too much weekend indulgence will come down and you can cut down on your dental bills at the same time.

So now we know it helps our bodies, inside and out, but what about our minds? Well, here’s something all of us know, green tea contains caffeine. Scientific studies have shown that, cafffeine can improve our moods, increase vigilance, reduce reaction time and sharpen the memory. The problem is the ‘jitteriness’ it causes our bodies to undergo. Green tea has cracked that problem. How?, you may ask. On one hand green tea contains close to the ideal amount of caffeine that the human body needs to stay alert. On the other it holds an amino acid called L-theanine, which can cross the blood-brain barrier and which research has shown to have an anti-anxiety effect on our brain! Ultimately, what you have is a slower, more stable release of energy, with increased productivity.

About the Author:

Niranjani is an entrepreneur and blogger who believes that good quality, affordable healthcare should be available to all. She occasionally puffs and pants her way through a 10k race to feel fit, despite her chaotic life.

Photo Credit: Image 1Image 2

Copyright 2013 (c) Primex Scans and Labs. Please do not reproduce this article in its entirety without permission. Alternatively, a link to this URL would be appreciated.

 

Summer Recovery – Starting a Workout Routine

The summer’s over, the days are getting a bit cooler thanks to the rain and the mangoes are dwindling away from the markets. Everyone’s enjoyed a break, to some extent, from routine, especially when it comes to food and exercise. Initially, your activity levels may have been higher playing with the neighbourhood children on their summer break or travelling to a new or well-loved location, however, gradually the weight piles on, your skin gets dull and your hair looks lank. You obviously need to get back on track to be ready in time for the festival season. Well, don’t despair we have a simple and effective program to get your health back on track.

This week we start with fitness. Our five step Summer Recovery- Starting the Workout program will help you get started afresh or pick-up where you let off at the beginning of summer.

  • Pick a Realistic Time

The time you choose to workout should be comfortably available for you on a daily basis. Having competing commitments at the same time, will ensure that you drop the new routine within a few weeks or even few days because it’s just too much of a challenge in your already busy day.

  • Enlist a Reliable Friend

Rope in someone who will give you that wake-up call for a morning workout or call you on out on lazing in front of the television, instead of going for your evening run. Even better get a workout partner who you know will push you. When you know you have to report into someone on your effort or performance, you will be a lot more dedicated.

  • Choose an Activity You Enjoy

Your workout time is ‘me’ time, something that you are doing for your mental and physical health. Enjoying it ensures that you’ll look forward to it and want to do it every single day. A sure fire way to stick to your workout plan. Another option is to mix up the activities in your workout to keep it interesting. Enjoy the last bit of warm weather with a host of outdoor activities. Spend weekends going on picnics and playing some cricket or volleyball.

  • Make it a Priority

Your daily workout is as important as brushing your teeth every morning or having your main meal of the day. You need to tell yourself that’s a non-negotiable and essential activity. A good way to do this is to remind yourself about why you’ve chosen to start this regime. Make yourself stick to it for four weeks without a lapse and by the end of the month it’ll be a part of your regular routine.

  • Reward Yourself

While the obvious result of an effective and regular workout routine is a healthy body and mind in the long run, we all need some motivation to keep going. Choose a reward that does not affect your fitness and set it as a reward against the milestone of completing a month of regular workouts.

Use these smart but simple steps to get yourself back to your fittest and healthiest self and you’ll be ready to enjoy the rest of the year.

About the Author:

Niranjani is an entrepreneur and blogger who believes that good quality, affordable healthcare should be available to all. She occasionally puffs and pants her way through a 10k race to feel fit, despite her chaotic life.

Photo Credit: Image 1Image 2

Copyright 2013 (c) Primex Scans and Labs. Please do not reproduce this article in its entirety without permission. Alternatively, a link to this URL would be appreciated.

 

Fit @ Fifty: Lean Quality – Lifestyle Management

50 ++? Now that’s the age to be in. Silver streaks that command respect and a sense of accomplishment! Comfortably placed, nice house and grown up kids, a large screen TV with a home theatre, a great place to work and a car for commuting. And holidays with family!

Or is it, numbers all around you and the boss breathing down your neck which is permanently on the block. Excitement and stress combined with a sedentary life, thanks to the air conditioned car, office and home. Driving, pecking at the laptop and blackberry while comfortably couched.

So which is it? Aren’t both part of the middle-aged dream life?

Of course it is. Dream you shall. Only those who dare dream, achieve! You walk this planet but once. So go right ahead.

That said, the road ahead is not always smooth; the road to quality has no end. These are corporate jargons that you are all familiar with. These are true statements. Health Insurance schemes, inter-alia, take care of the road ahead to a large extent. But ‘quality of physiological life’ needs a different approach. A ‘lean quality approach’ maybe? So what is this lean quality process? Lean processes are the latest diet craze in the world of quality control. Lean is a quality control technique you can use to identify and eliminate the flab in your company’s processes. The “flab” is all the dead weight carried by a process without adding any value. The customer doesn’t want to pay for dead weight, so why should you?

Similarly, by adapting a lean process for your own healthcare, you can significantly reduce health related risks and set yourself up for a smooth ride ahead. Lean provides a robust framework that facilitates improving efficiency and effectiveness by focusing on critical customer requirements. Lean is a management system that focuses on delivering value to the end customer by continuously improving value delivery processes.

Value Stream Mapping

People think in images not in words. Look yourself up in the mirror. Reflect on your lifestyle. For most of us who are over 50 our lifestyle dictates that during most part of the day when you are at work or back home, you are sitting behind the wheel driving your car or you are seated travelling, else you are seated behind your desk at work peering into your computer or at some files, or you are in your couch at home watching TV. Imagine the amount of time you spend in this sitting posture. Do you know what happens to your muscles in this posture? Remaining seated for long periods creates a static load on our body resulting in muscle fatigue and restricted blood circulation and will affect our health considerably in the long run. Remaining seated for prolonged periods disrupts metabolic functions that lead to poor vascular health. This is part of the package that comes along with the life that we dreamed of. Now that we have identified the flab, we need to remove it while we continue to enjoy the lifestyle that we have rightfully earned. Women who reach 50 years of age need to prepare themselves to face the additional challenges posed by the onset of menopause. Women tend to gain weight as they age due to decease in muscle mass and accumulation of excess fat and lower resting metabolic rate. Hormonal shifts can cause a range of symptoms and increase overall risk for heart disease and stroke. The absorption of certain nutrients may also decrease because of a loss of stomach acid.

The Lean Integration Principles

 Build quality. Do your stretches before and after your exercise schedule. This is mandatory and so is a consultation with a doctor before you embark on an exercise schedule. Follow through with your doctor periodically. Augment with daily doses of Multivitamins, Calcium, Vitamin C and Vitamin D.

The Lean Integration Principles

  1. Focus on yourself. You are in control of your health. The change begins and ends with you. It is such a simple change. You just need to ensure that the flab that came along with the package disappears. You don’t need it. It’s a waste. Exercise is the elixir that removes waste and gives a new meaning to your well-earned lifestyle. It should be our goal to exercise to have a strong heart and muscles, decreased stiffness and less body fat.
    1. Walking, running, dancing or cycling are good cardio exercises that you can build into your exercise schedule. Walking and Cycling are relatively easier on the knee than running or dancing. They need not be a rigorous. You can walk to the grocery, you can take the stairway to your office or your apartment, and you can cycle to your club or even to your office if you are blessed with a residence that is close by. A good 30-45 minutes of cardio exercises two days a week is recommend.
    2. Two days in a week should be utilized for muscle strengthening. Weight training under supervision is the best way to do this. Invest in a membership in a gym or use the gym in your club to your advantage. The return on investment is considerable. Research shows that by age 65 we end up losing 20% – 30% of our strength and every decade after 65 the rate of loss speeds up. The good news is that this rate can be slowed down by building muscle through weight training. If you have not done weight training at all in your life so far, it does not matter. Start at 50 and set yourself up to be fit at 65 and beyond. That leaves us with 3 more days in a week.  
    3. Chose the sport that you love. Go out and enjoy playing for an hour, two days of the week. It could be badminton, tennis, swimming, volley ball or any other game. Give it your best, both physically and mentally. This will keep you physically fit and mentally sharp. While aerobic exercise improves cardiovascular fitness, strength training can build muscle mass and bone density. Both come in handy when you’re trying to pick up your grandchild or even simply a bag of groceries.  
    4. On the seventh day, whichever day of the week that is – normally a weekend, turn off your alarm clock. Catch up with sleep. Read a book. Work on a crossword to keep you mentally agile. Spend time with family. That’s an hour a day, six days a week, all for you. And imagine, until now someone else was managing your time. Now you are managing it yourself. Not to forget the whole of the seventh day that you will devote to yourself and your family. Isn’t this wonderful. 50++ is not so bad after all!
  2. Once you are set continuous improvements can be introduced. For example as you  progress you could build-in interval training in your cardio exercise schedule – alternating 10 min fast and 10 min slow or any similar time alternates that can be built-in within the total exercise time for better results.
  3. You are empowered to take your decisions. You can decide to walk, dance, cycle or run. Innovate. Try something new. Do not fear failure.
  4. Change is constant. Plan for change. If you had a wonderful place where you could cycle but had to move to a different home from where you cannot access this place, don’t let it be a show stopper. Go for a run, do something else that you enjoy.
  5. Optimize the whole. Adopt a big picture perspective. Introduce a good dietary system into your lifestyle. Clearly, the diet for the 50+ will conform to the goals of maintaining weight, consuming heart-healthy foods and building strength. Research shows that even modest exercise and changes in diet can bring considerable benefits regardless of the age you start. You don’t need to run marathons to shape up after 50, but you do need to get moving.
  6. Automate. While I wouldn’t want to call it rigor, it should become part of your DNA. It should happen by itself.
  7. Build quality. Do your stretches before and after your exercise schedule. This is mandatory and so is a consultation with a doctor before you embark on an exercise schedule. Follow through with your doctor periodically. Augment with daily doses of Multivitamins, Calcium, Vitamin C and Vitamin D.

Lean is not just for quality in the manufacturing or service industries. Lean is for quality in your lifestyle. Health is quality. Exercising and eating right is health. Dream, achieve and build quality into your lifestyle. Enjoy life 50++.

About the author:

Naresh is a fitness enthusiast who enjoys running, rowing and a multitude of outdoor sports. He also works in the healthcare industry and, at close to sixty years, is trying to create awareness of the concept of health through fitness.

Photo Credit: Image 1

Copyright 2013 (c) Primex Scans and Labs. Please do not reproduce this article in its entirety without permission. Alternatively, a link to this URL would be appreciated.

 

The Workout Series – Swimming Zen

We are back with a new sport as part of our our workout series to help you figure out the right fitness regime for your body and mind. We previously covered rowing and running, with a guide to picking the right shoe and a three week campaign to get you out on the road. Now we bring you the lowdown on another outdoor activity to enjoy – swimming. 

Swimming is magical. No I’m serious. How you ask? Well, I’ll tell you exactly how. First when you immerse yourself in the water you are cut off from all outside stimuli, no sounds or sights that might distract you. The constant lapping of the water at your ears almost works as a system of involuntary meditation and your thoughts turn inwards. Second, the water bears the weight of your body, ensuring that even the heaviest of people or those with injuries can comfortably workout or just enjoy the water. Third, the natural resistance created by the water increases the quality of your workout without any extra equipment. All this, and more, with absolutely no conscious effort on your part! Now, tell me, that isn’t magic?

Now that I’ve convinced you about why you should swim, let’s move on to the how. For beginners, or those who have not confident about their technique, the safest way is to be trained by a certified professional in a controlled environment. Take no risks since the dangers of swimming are life-threatening and way more serious when compared to other sports. (This is the only real downside of this sport, in my limited opinion.) On the same lines, never swim if a qualified life-guard is not present and always respect the signals sent by your body, such as a sudden cramping sensation.

Coming back to the mechanics of swimming, the most important aspect is lung capacity and your breathing technique. Once you have mastered the right style of breathing and strengthened your lungs there is nothing stopping you from an Olympic medal except practice. Setting aside our visions of grandeur for now, we can start with the most common strokes:

Free Style: This is the simplest of strokes and the one most suited to beginners.  There are variations of this basic stroke as well, but the most common one is where the arms alternate underwater and overhead and the legs flutter (kick) up and down without bending the knees. This is also known as the survival stroke, as one can keep it up for hours if breathing correctly.

Back stroke: This is a relaxing stroke as you can choose to float more and just use your arms and legs for direction and occasional propulsion. Obviously, if you are actually swimming using the backstroke, the arms move in a backward windmill action and the legs do a flutter kick or deeper synchronized kicks.

Breast stroke: This stroke can be done with your head completely out of water or bobbing in and out for breathe. The calorie burn in this stroke is higher than both the back stroke and freestyle. The arms move in a synchronized in-out motion underwater, while the legs do a powerful frog kick.

There are numerous types of swim styles such as the butterfly stroke (which I have yet to master), which turn swimming into a performance art, however, to start with the three strokes discussed above are the simplest.

The next obvious question would be, ‘who can swim?’. Based on discussions with doctors specialising in sports injuries, athletes who have been swimming for years and my personal experiences over thirty years, it seems like anyone (and I mean that literally) can swim. You can be eighty, have a physical disability, be overweight and still comfortably swim everyday. Swimming is extremely easy on the joints, while building endurance, muscular strength and cardiovascular fitness.

The best part of swimming for a workout is that it brings a sense of freedom and fun into the experience. After all splashing about in water is most children’s favourite activity and who doesn’t want to relive their carefree childhood days? So go rediscover the simple joys of life, while getting fit and maybe spending some time with your family or visiting your zen place.

See you in the deep blue.

About the Author:

Niranjani is an entrepreneur and blogger who believes that good quality, affordable healthcare should be available to all. She occasional puffs and pants her way through a 10k race to feel fit, despite her chaotic life.

Photo Credit: Image 1, Image 2

Copyright 2013 (c) Primex Scans and Labs. Please do not reproduce this article in its entirety without permission. Alternatively, a link to this URL would be appreciated.

A Ray of Golden Sunshine

Eggs, are you’re kidding me? I don’t touch them. That old fashioned notion of an egg a day for breakfast is just begging for heart disease and an abnormal cholesterol profile. It was eating too many eggs that killed my dear grandfather at the age of ninety eight.

Like many trends, research in food has come full circle on this one. Studies made by several groups worldwide, have now come to the same conclusion that your grandmother did fifty years ago. Eggs always were, and continue to be one of the healthiest foods in the world.

They are packed with vitamins A, D, E, B2, B6, B9, iron, calcium, phosphorous, potassium and choline (an integral component in brain and nerve health). The sunny yellow yolk contains lutein and zeaxanthin (These carotenoids probably kept your grandfather’s eyes healthy until a ripe old age, and will do the same for you, if you let them.)

Eggs are one of the few foods considered to be complete proteins. A complete protein contains the nine essential amino acids your body cannot produce naturally. Regarded as the “building blocks” of the body, amino acids help form protein and are vital to your body’s health. Two of the amino acids found in eggs -Tryptophan and Tyrosine are anti-depressants. They also contain Melatonin that will help you get a peaceful night’s sleep.

A large egg contains six grams of the highest quality protein found in any food. Protein is found in both the egg white and the yolk, with just over half in the white and the remainder in the yolk. Eat the whole egg to really benefit from it. Those twelve egg white omelets are both unnatural and a complete waste of the valuable yolk. Limit your consumption of eggs, to a maximum of three to four per week, but, eat the whole egg.

I can almost see your eyebrows touching your hair line at this point. What about all that stuff we’ve been hearing about the egg yolk being high in fat and creating high LDL cholesterol and ultimately leading to heart disease? In fact, a boiled egg contains only seventy calories. That’s about the same as a chappati or large slice of bread. Moreover, recent research shows that eating eggs every day does not significantly raise LDL cholesterol levels or contribute to the risk of heart disease, for most healthy men and women. I know we keep repeating this but it’s important to remember, the real villains are the saturated and trans-fats found in foods. These fats increase blood cholesterol and the risk of heart disease. It is not the egg that’s the bad guy here, but your method of cooking it. A large egg contains only 1.5 grams saturated fat and zero trans-fats. It’s the deep frying of the egg or the rich gravy that constitutes the egg curry that create all the problems.

A boiled or poached egg for breakfast is an ideal way to start your day. It will keep you feeling full and satisfied until lunch, so you will not be tempted to give into mid-morning junk food cravings, and you will have all the nutrients you need to keep you bright and sunny all day. So go for that ray of golden sunshine.

About the author:

Sunitha Srinivasan has qualified with the National Association of Fitness Certification in the USA as a Lifestyle Consultant and Resistance Trainer. She focuses on helping people with their struggle to create a balanced and healthy lifestyle,  given the time constraints and stress present in today’s world.
She also conducts workshops on Wellness, Stress Management and Work-Life balance.
She can be reached at Sunitha@sans-souci.in

Photo Credit: Image 1

Copyright 2012 (c) Primex Scans and Labs. Please do not reproduce this article in its entirety without permission. Alternatively, a link to this URL would be appreciated.

Back to Fitness: How to Pick a Running Shoe

Congrats on achieving your goal. You have now successfully run 3.5 kms. It’s a great feeling isn’t it.

It’s now time to head to the nearest shoe store and get yourself a new running shoe. You deserve it! Here are a few tips to consider before you make the buying decision. There are many types of running shoes and several popular brands. Follow these steps to make the process of picking the right shoe simple and effective:

Step 1

If you run mostly on paved surfaces like the road or sidewalk,  choose the most common type of running shoe. If you like to run on dirt paths or hiking trails, you may want to choose a trail running shoe.

Step 2

Find your shoe size. Check it more than once. You probably already know your size for casual or dress shoes, but running shoes can be sized slightly differently. Some running shoes have particularly roomy toe boxes, sometimes with more room than necessary. You may need to go a size smaller or larger. You also want to consider whether you have a very narrow or wide foot. Try as many as you want. It is important to feel comfortable during the run.

Step 3

Feet come in three basic shapes: normal, flat and high-arched. A normal foot lands on the outside and rolls slightly inward to absorb shock. If you have normal feet, you do not require a shoe that offers motion control. A flat foot has minimal arch, and usually rolls (pronates) excessively, which can lead to overuse injuries. Flat-footed runners need shoes with motion control. A high-arched foot is just as it sounds and requires more shock absorption and plenty of flexibility.

Step 4

Some of specialized sports shoe stores have the facility of trying out the shoes in a tread mill. I recommend you do that. Pick three or four pairs based on the above. Try running at a comfortable pace and at an increased pace. Don’t try without socks. It’s a good idea to take a pair with you. If this facility is not available, wear them and walk around and chose the one that is most comfortable. Ask for advice. Most sales persons are trained to recommend the right pair.

You are now ready to start on your running schedules. Remember all that we have discussed and enjoy the marathon season ahead.

Greetings of the Season, Merry Christmas and a fit and healthy New year.

About the author:

Naresh is a fitness enthusiast who enjoys running, rowing and a multitude of outdoor sports. He also works in the healthcare industry and, at close to sixty years, is trying to create awareness of the concept of health through fitness.

Photo Credit: Image 1

Copyright 2012 (c) Primex Scans and Labs. Please do not reproduce this article in its entirety without permission. Alternatively, a link to this URL would be appreciated.

 

Back to Fitness: Week 2 Round-Up

So we are successfully into week 3 of the program, the most intensive and rewarding stretch. After the 36 minute workout on Friday and the family sports session on Saturday, did you relax with a meal at your favourite restaurant of Sunday?

This morning we seriously started running and I’m sure most of you have started experiencing the famous ‘runner’s high’. This adrenaline rush is addictive and beats any other I’ve known. Having said that, let’s jump right into today’s topic.

In the last round up we spoke about the various postures of Running. Let us today consider the finer aspects of ‘foot strike’. What is ‘strike’? ‘Strike’ refers to the landing of the foot during the motion of running. So where should the foot land and how? Is there any recommended style? Here are some answers.

Strike could happen in three different ways – fore-foot, mid-foot and heel. There is NO researched conclusive evidence yet to prove that one of these is the best and the most effective.

Our body adopts a pattern that best suits individual needs based on energy output, speed and body type. Foot strike patterns are natural and are attributes of human characteristics and the bio-mechanics/physiology of our body. At this juncture it is sufficient to note that 75 percent of runners are heel strikers. The percentage of fore-foot strikers is marginal. If you reach for the landing then you will strike with your heel. If you allow your feet to land under your body, then you will strike with your mid-foot.

So right now don’t worry about where you are striking – front, mid or heel. Leave that to your natural gait and “gravity”.  Here’s what you need to remember :

  • Relax your head and shoulders. They set the mood for the rest of your body. You will be surprised to see how the rest of the body reacts almost immediately and relaxes.
  • Take care of your knees. Do not ‘overstride’ or drive your knees up and forward. If you overstride you will be striking in front of your mass. Think of lifting your feet off the ground and striking under your body instead. This theory of Pose Running seems to work for most runners I know.
  • Eat right, hydrate yourself well with lots of water, and don’t forget your stretches before and after the routine.

Happy Running!

About the author:

Naresh is a fitness enthusiast who enjoys running, rowing and a multitude of outdoor sports. He also works in the healthcare industry and, at close to sixty years, is trying to create awareness of the concept of health through fitness.

Photo Credit: Image 1

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Demystifying health, healthcare and the secrets of a healthy lifestyle

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Demystifying health, healthcare and the secrets of a healthy lifestyle