Tag Archives: work-life balance

5 Healthy Ideas to Try This Week

Every January all of us make resolutions, many of which center around health and fitness. The problem with these resolutions is, we have the big picture but not the steps to achieve them and so they ultimately fall by the wayside. This year, we at Beaming Health Magazine decided to share a few tips to help you stay on the road to good health and fitness. So, plunge right in and do let us know which ones worked for you. 

  • Let the Winter Olympics inspire you to reconnect with a childhood game. Be it hockey, tennis, basketball, swimming or even just running free.
  • Discuss an issue that has been creating undue stress for you with someone you can rely on. Then work on eliminating or at least minimizing the source of that stress 
  • Eat one green meal every week. Be it an exotic one or a simple and delicious homemade one, the focus is on including as much raw plant-based food as possible in that meal
  • Switch off all electronic devices an hour before you go to sleep and read a book instead. This includes all computers, phones and the television
  • Spend five minutes in the morning doing a few, simple stretching or deep breathing exercises before you start your day. The quality of transition time, from sleep to alertness will make a difference to the quality of your day

Make these small changes in your weekly routine and soon you’ll be thanking us.

About the Author:

Niranjani is an entrepreneur and blogger who believes that good quality, affordable healthcare should be available to all. She occasionally puffs and pants her way through a 10k race to feel fit, despite her chaotic life.

Photo Credit: Image 1

Copyright 2014 (c) Primex Scans and Labs. Please do not reproduce this article in its entirety without permission. Alternatively, a link to this URL would be appreciated.

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15 Minute Workouts – The Pajama Workouts

Sleep late, get-up early, make and pack multiple meals, get to work, work 12 hours, meet friends/do homework with the kids, cook dinner, tidy-up the house, do the laundry and drop exhausted into bed.

Given that most of us have a routine close to this, where do we find the time and most importantly the energy to workout. We know it’s important, we make New Year resolutions, frequently start off on fitness plans, however, within four weeks most of us are back to square one.

Now, how would you like to spend just 15 minutes in your bedroom getting fit. It can even be, or should I say it must be, in your pajamas. Trust me, it is possible and it does give results. This week we’ll start with the all time favourite of children and sportsmen – skipping or jump rope exercises. Here’s what you do:

  • Set the jump rope and comfortable workout shoes, next to your bed, the previous night
  • Wake-up 10 minutes earlier than usual and slip on your footwear
  • Do 2 minutes of stretching exercises
  • Jump rope for about 10 minutes
  • Take a minute to cool down
  • Stretch again for 2 minutes
  • You are done! Now go take a shower

A few points to keep in mind, to make sure you really benefit from this effort:

  • 100 -120 counts a minute should be your target (apparently 10 minutes of this is equal to 30 minutes of mid-paced running)
  • Start with 5 minutes on the first day and build-up
  • Your heart rate should be up for 7 out of the 10 minutes, at a minimum
  • Most important, check with your doctor before starting any new fitness or diet routine

Follow this religiously (maybe even twice a day), along with a simple diet change, and see the results in 90 days. You will be amazed and addicted. The best part – no expensive equipment, clothes or gym membership required.

Our workout series aims to help you figure out the right fitness regime for your body and mind. As part of this series, we previously  covered: cyclingswimmingrowingrunning, a guide to picking the right shoe, a three-week campaign to get you out on the road and how to mentally condition yourself to get going.

About the Author:

Niranjani is an entrepreneur and blogger who believes that good quality, affordable healthcare should be available to all. She occasionally puffs and pants her way through a 10k race to feel fit, despite her chaotic life.

Photo Credit: Image 1

Copyright 2014 (c) Primex Scans and Labs. Please do not reproduce this article in its entirety without permission. Alternatively, a link to this URL would be appreciated.

Fit @ Fifty: Lean Quality – Lifestyle Management

50 ++? Now that’s the age to be in. Silver streaks that command respect and a sense of accomplishment! Comfortably placed, nice house and grown up kids, a large screen TV with a home theatre, a great place to work and a car for commuting. And holidays with family!

Or is it, numbers all around you and the boss breathing down your neck which is permanently on the block. Excitement and stress combined with a sedentary life, thanks to the air conditioned car, office and home. Driving, pecking at the laptop and blackberry while comfortably couched.

So which is it? Aren’t both part of the middle-aged dream life?

Of course it is. Dream you shall. Only those who dare dream, achieve! You walk this planet but once. So go right ahead.

That said, the road ahead is not always smooth; the road to quality has no end. These are corporate jargons that you are all familiar with. These are true statements. Health Insurance schemes, inter-alia, take care of the road ahead to a large extent. But ‘quality of physiological life’ needs a different approach. A ‘lean quality approach’ maybe? So what is this lean quality process? Lean processes are the latest diet craze in the world of quality control. Lean is a quality control technique you can use to identify and eliminate the flab in your company’s processes. The “flab” is all the dead weight carried by a process without adding any value. The customer doesn’t want to pay for dead weight, so why should you?

Similarly, by adapting a lean process for your own healthcare, you can significantly reduce health related risks and set yourself up for a smooth ride ahead. Lean provides a robust framework that facilitates improving efficiency and effectiveness by focusing on critical customer requirements. Lean is a management system that focuses on delivering value to the end customer by continuously improving value delivery processes.

Value Stream Mapping

People think in images not in words. Look yourself up in the mirror. Reflect on your lifestyle. For most of us who are over 50 our lifestyle dictates that during most part of the day when you are at work or back home, you are sitting behind the wheel driving your car or you are seated travelling, else you are seated behind your desk at work peering into your computer or at some files, or you are in your couch at home watching TV. Imagine the amount of time you spend in this sitting posture. Do you know what happens to your muscles in this posture? Remaining seated for long periods creates a static load on our body resulting in muscle fatigue and restricted blood circulation and will affect our health considerably in the long run. Remaining seated for prolonged periods disrupts metabolic functions that lead to poor vascular health. This is part of the package that comes along with the life that we dreamed of. Now that we have identified the flab, we need to remove it while we continue to enjoy the lifestyle that we have rightfully earned. Women who reach 50 years of age need to prepare themselves to face the additional challenges posed by the onset of menopause. Women tend to gain weight as they age due to decease in muscle mass and accumulation of excess fat and lower resting metabolic rate. Hormonal shifts can cause a range of symptoms and increase overall risk for heart disease and stroke. The absorption of certain nutrients may also decrease because of a loss of stomach acid.

The Lean Integration Principles

 Build quality. Do your stretches before and after your exercise schedule. This is mandatory and so is a consultation with a doctor before you embark on an exercise schedule. Follow through with your doctor periodically. Augment with daily doses of Multivitamins, Calcium, Vitamin C and Vitamin D.

The Lean Integration Principles

  1. Focus on yourself. You are in control of your health. The change begins and ends with you. It is such a simple change. You just need to ensure that the flab that came along with the package disappears. You don’t need it. It’s a waste. Exercise is the elixir that removes waste and gives a new meaning to your well-earned lifestyle. It should be our goal to exercise to have a strong heart and muscles, decreased stiffness and less body fat.
    1. Walking, running, dancing or cycling are good cardio exercises that you can build into your exercise schedule. Walking and Cycling are relatively easier on the knee than running or dancing. They need not be a rigorous. You can walk to the grocery, you can take the stairway to your office or your apartment, and you can cycle to your club or even to your office if you are blessed with a residence that is close by. A good 30-45 minutes of cardio exercises two days a week is recommend.
    2. Two days in a week should be utilized for muscle strengthening. Weight training under supervision is the best way to do this. Invest in a membership in a gym or use the gym in your club to your advantage. The return on investment is considerable. Research shows that by age 65 we end up losing 20% – 30% of our strength and every decade after 65 the rate of loss speeds up. The good news is that this rate can be slowed down by building muscle through weight training. If you have not done weight training at all in your life so far, it does not matter. Start at 50 and set yourself up to be fit at 65 and beyond. That leaves us with 3 more days in a week.  
    3. Chose the sport that you love. Go out and enjoy playing for an hour, two days of the week. It could be badminton, tennis, swimming, volley ball or any other game. Give it your best, both physically and mentally. This will keep you physically fit and mentally sharp. While aerobic exercise improves cardiovascular fitness, strength training can build muscle mass and bone density. Both come in handy when you’re trying to pick up your grandchild or even simply a bag of groceries.  
    4. On the seventh day, whichever day of the week that is – normally a weekend, turn off your alarm clock. Catch up with sleep. Read a book. Work on a crossword to keep you mentally agile. Spend time with family. That’s an hour a day, six days a week, all for you. And imagine, until now someone else was managing your time. Now you are managing it yourself. Not to forget the whole of the seventh day that you will devote to yourself and your family. Isn’t this wonderful. 50++ is not so bad after all!
  2. Once you are set continuous improvements can be introduced. For example as you  progress you could build-in interval training in your cardio exercise schedule – alternating 10 min fast and 10 min slow or any similar time alternates that can be built-in within the total exercise time for better results.
  3. You are empowered to take your decisions. You can decide to walk, dance, cycle or run. Innovate. Try something new. Do not fear failure.
  4. Change is constant. Plan for change. If you had a wonderful place where you could cycle but had to move to a different home from where you cannot access this place, don’t let it be a show stopper. Go for a run, do something else that you enjoy.
  5. Optimize the whole. Adopt a big picture perspective. Introduce a good dietary system into your lifestyle. Clearly, the diet for the 50+ will conform to the goals of maintaining weight, consuming heart-healthy foods and building strength. Research shows that even modest exercise and changes in diet can bring considerable benefits regardless of the age you start. You don’t need to run marathons to shape up after 50, but you do need to get moving.
  6. Automate. While I wouldn’t want to call it rigor, it should become part of your DNA. It should happen by itself.
  7. Build quality. Do your stretches before and after your exercise schedule. This is mandatory and so is a consultation with a doctor before you embark on an exercise schedule. Follow through with your doctor periodically. Augment with daily doses of Multivitamins, Calcium, Vitamin C and Vitamin D.

Lean is not just for quality in the manufacturing or service industries. Lean is for quality in your lifestyle. Health is quality. Exercising and eating right is health. Dream, achieve and build quality into your lifestyle. Enjoy life 50++.

About the author:

Naresh is a fitness enthusiast who enjoys running, rowing and a multitude of outdoor sports. He also works in the healthcare industry and, at close to sixty years, is trying to create awareness of the concept of health through fitness.

Photo Credit: Image 1

Copyright 2013 (c) Primex Scans and Labs. Please do not reproduce this article in its entirety without permission. Alternatively, a link to this URL would be appreciated.

 

The Tiffin Dabba Saga

Do you go to sleep every Sunday night with this on loop in your head?  “Oh my God, it’s Monday tomorrow! The beginning of another mad week which means getting ready for work, trying to fit in some exercise, deadlines, schedules… and the biggest worry, trying to pack lunch for my fussy seven-year old.”

Most days, the dabba comes back untouched. The days he’s nibbled something, I count myself lucky. He hates vegetables and the school doesn’t encourage meaty lunches. He will eat a boiled egg but the teacher says he spills the shell all around the table…. Does all this sound familiar? I’ve even known a parent who used to pack deep-fried slices of bread, which had been dipped in sugar syrup, every day for her daughter’s lunch. Why? Because that was the ONLY thing the child would eat and the mother was so desperate that she would pack almost anything.

By the way, habits of fussy eating are picked up mostly from parents. If you want your child to eat healthy, then eat healthy yourself! The dictum of “do as I say, but not as I do” has never worked and never will.  Examine your reactions to food. Do you make a face at brinjal? Do you say “yuck” to garlic? Do you complain when the idlis are hard or the dosa is not crisp? Do you absolutely refuse to try any new food, saying “I know I won’t like it” before even putting a spoonful in your mouth? Guess what, ninety nine times out of a hundred, that ‘s exactly what your child will do too. The hundredth, will probably turn out to be a rebel and eat insects picked up off the ground or mud from the garden just to have the pleasure of hearing you go “eeeeeuuuuggghhh, how could you?”.

Now, hanging your head in shame is not going let you see the screen in front of you. To figure out what next, look up and read on. These simple steps will make you the envy of all the mothers at the school gate:

  • Be enthusiastic about new experiences, whether it’s new books, new friends, new places or new food.
  • Be energetic. I agree that it’s easier to pack a sandwich than make a stuffed paratha, however, if you want results, there are no short cuts! If you want to create a healthy lifestyle for you and your family, it involves work. My tip here, prepare as much as you can a day before.
  • Be creative. If you have a kid who asks why he should thank god for his food when his food it consists of only ‘yucky veggies”? Make green, red and orange paranthas or pooris by kneading flour with boiled, puréed spinach or peas, beetroot and carrots. The same trick can be used for idlis and dosas.
  • Make it “cool”. For example, dosas in his lunch box again? Stuff them with a mixture of sautéed spinach, corn and cheese or paneer.
  • Be inclusive. Involve your child in the cutting, pounding and kneading activities of food preparation.  The excitement of creating their own food can carry over into eating it and sharing it. The big bonus, they learn to appreciate the effort you put in everyday.
  • Create anticipation. Tell them what to expect in their lunch box and show it to them before they leave (if you’re not rushed off your feet). Trust me, they’ll look forward to lunch time.  To keep the momentum, don’t forget to plan an occasional surprise, which creates its own excitement and breaks the monotony of always knowing what’s in the box.
  • Learn about nutrition and share it with your family. These are skills not taught at school and there’s nothing like a practical lesson at home on what the humble curd rice is loaded with – probiotics and calcium – to make it a “hero”. Ditto for the reviled brinjal and the much hated bitter gourd. Don’t force these down their throats too often though, this will cause even a saint to rebel.
  • Cook with love, creativity will flow!  Even humble steamed carrot, peas and potatoes can be made “awesome” by adding a tad of butter and some herbs.
  • Keep it simple. Children tend to prefer simpler foods to more complex, adult foods. Steamed vegetables, sundal and rotis, or rice form a complete meal, while being easy to make and pack.
  • Keep them small. Finger foods, small wraps with rotis and vegetables in a salad dressing or mayo and some cheese, all look good, taste good and make kids happy.
  • Enjoy the process. Think of it as an outlet for your creativity. Approach food and cooking with anticipation and excitement and it will repay you hugely. Approach it as though it’s a chore to be done as quickly and with as little involvement as possible and it’s guaranteed to be a pain.
  • With all this, there are still days when your child will not eat what’s in the dabba. Well, if it’s just a one-off day, don’t sweat it. We all need an occasional break. If it’s too frequent an occurrence and then consider what further action is needed.

I, however, have to add a note of caution here on being ready for the unexpected. Why? Because I am a mother of two and know that kids are unpredictable. My four year-old daughter came back from school one day with her untouched box of pinwheel sandwiches. We had made these with great excitement and enthusiasm the previous night. Why did she not eat them? Well, she thought ‘they were too beautiful to eat’!

About the Author:

AnuradhaVenkatesh is an entrepreneur with a passion for education. She loves food and everything to do with it (the making, the reading about, the eating, the dreaming), word games, kids, the monsoon and mangoes  – though not necessarily in that order.

Photo Credit: Image 1

Copyright 2012 (c) Primex Scans and Labs. Please do not reproduce this article in its entirety without permission. Alternatively, a link to this URL would be appreciated.

Is Work Making You Sick?

The alarmingly sedentary!

Wake up call, coffee, news, bath, dress and drive

To office!

Tooth in your ear, words ringing, sometimes chewed –annoying!

Mails and meetings, lobbies and coffee shops, traffic snarls-galling.

Spouse and kids already in bids

The movie is always on time.

Burger in hand and Diet Coke for dowsing,

Eyelids drooping.

And back!

Mattresses depressed anew.

Sedentary alarm!

Wake up call.

The sedentary lives of potato couches. Sounds very familiar, doesn’t it? Unwittingly we tend to get ourselves entangled in this corporate vortex, which is not a great state of affairs and obviously needs immediate correction. Awareness is the starting point and the best way is to make physical activity a part of our daily lives.

I’m not suggesting that all of us try to structure the rigor of an exercise schedule into our 24 hour-plus day. Instead it could just mesh in with our daily routine. Here are a few ideas:

  • BREAKFAST MOVES – Do a set of stretching exercises while watching your favorite news channel in the morning before breakfast. Add-on a bit off on the spot running and/or skipping to the morning stretches
  • ON THE GO – Avoid the lift and take the stairway to your parking bay while you carry your laptop bag and lunch yourself. You can also plug in your ipod and headphones office and take the stairs upto your office. Alternatively, get off the lift one or more floors floor below and walk up
  • POSTUR’ING’ – Maintaining the right posture, especially while seated, increases blood circulation and helps us  stay and feel more productive. Sit on a chair with your legs bent at right angles and feet flat on the ground. Push your lower back against the base of the chair to maintain the natural curvature of your spine. Lengthen your spine by stretching the top of your had toward the ceiling, while tucking in your chin. Keep your shoulders relaxed and your upper back and neck comfortably straight.
  • TALK THE WALK – In the office, if you tend to talk for long durations on your mobile, take the opportunity to walk up and down the corridor while doing so rather than being seated at your desk
  • ACTIVE SIESTA – After lunch, shut off your mobile and take a quick walk down the garden path if there is one in your office. Else, you could walk in the car park area for five minutes. While working, take two minutes off your work-time every hour to stand, stretch your arms, legs and body, and blank out your mind to give it some rest
  • SOCIALIZE – Instead of using the intercom or internal telephone to speak to a colleague, get up and visit their space. This gives you an excuse to stretch your legs, while a face to face conversation usually yields quicker results than a call or email
  • WORK ‘OUT’ – Use the office gym, if your office has one, or do some desk workouts

This way the required physical activity gets built-in and becomes regular without affecting our daily office routine and will help us perform much more efficiently in a highly stressed corporate environment.

The Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA says, in one of their blogs, that a sedentary lifestyle carries with it a risk of obesity and type 2 Diabetes. The World Health Organization (WHO) has issued a warning that a sedentary lifestyle could very well be among the ten leading causes of death and disability in the world. By choosing physical activity as the theme for World Health Day, WHO is promoting a healthy, active and tobacco-free life style. The aim is to prevent the disease and disability caused by unhealthy and sedentary living.

So let’s pack in some physical activity as part of our daily routine or better still build in an exercise program over a week that we plan to sick to, come what may. Exercise, keep fit and live a healthy life.

About the Author:

Naresh is a fitness enthusiast who enjoys running, rowing and a multitude of outdoor sports. He also works in the healthcare industry and, at close to sixty years, is trying to create awareness of the concept of health through fitness.

Photo Credit: Image 1

Copyright 2012 (c) Primex Scans and Labs. Please do not reproduce this article in its entirety without permission. Alternatively, a link to this URL would be appreciated.

Demystifying health, healthcare and the secrets of a healthy lifestyle

WebMD Health

Demystifying health, healthcare and the secrets of a healthy lifestyle